Monday, November 21, 2016

Pokemon Pulse:Observations in the Launch Distance of Pokemon

This was done by Team My Little Python members Chris and Ashlyn, with some help from me. Don't expect it to be nearly as good as my original content.




Pokemon Pulse:Observations in the Launch Distances of Pokemon
Ashlyn K. Bilderback|Allison J. Metler|Christopher B. McSwain

Procedure

In this study, we launched Pokemon and figured out their distance. We set to figure out which Pokemon flew the farthest when launched from a miniature catapult. We launched 11 small Pokemon toys and measured the distance of each one with a tape measure.

Results

Spearow|230 in.
Surskit|242 in.
Spinarak|7’8”
Shieldon|7’6”
Shinx|11’7”
Zebstrika|4’8”
Dialga|4’5”
Porygon|8’
Elekid|10’1”
Torchic|11’1’
Magnemite|9’5”

Conclusion

We noticed that Pokemon with a generally round body shape, such as Elekid, Torchic, and Surskit, traveled the longest distances wheras larger, more linear Pokemon such as Zebstrika and Dialga traveled the least distance.



Pokemon and its associated characters, trademarks, and logos are copyright Nintendo and Game Freak 1996-present.

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

My views on PETA ***HIGHLY OPINIONATED***

Lately I've been checking out who's following My Little Python and I've realized that we're getting a lot of different people with different views, many of whom are involved with PETA in some way. So, I've been checking out places like PETA's website and social media pages to formulate these views. But, first there are some rules. I understand that these views may contradict yours and that's okay! But, for commenting:

  • No pictures. A lot of the people who view this blog are from My Little Python and I don't think they want to see depressing animal pictures.
  • Treat others as you want to be treated.
  • Don't post anything you wouldn't want a hypothetical little sister to see. As in, no profanity and be kind.
All right. Let's talk about one of the things that PETA has shown that they want. This is for the entire population of Earth to go vegan. This is a pretty good goal, okay? And it's a great thing to work for! But, even if PETA were to replace the land occupied by slaughterhouses and animal farms with purely plant farms, we'd still need a lot more farms because by nature, the plant life cycle is slower than that of an animal at a slaughterhouse. And some of those farms would have to be on animals' habitat so animals would die and it would still be at the hands of humans. Now, in the long run, it would mean fewer animals would be killed. But animals would die in the process. Also, if these farms use pesticides, not only would insects die, but so would amphibians and other animals. All right? Also, for people: There are many people who couldn't go vegan. And I'm not talking "but bacon tastes so good" can't go vegan. I'm talking people who can't afford vegetables or whose area is in a drought so they can't grow vegetables. These people literally need to kill animals to survive. Now, I hope that PETA will only do the "entire population going vegan" thing for people in fairly wealthy countries who can afford to go vegan. But, we'll have to see.

Another thing that PETA has shown they want is for all captive animals to be freed. Now, not only would this be a sad day for all pet owners everywhere, but also, I can probably, without thinking that much, name at least 3 species that have been saved from extinction by captive breeding. Also, in many cases, their premise is acting on a logical fallacy. After showing the example of one roadside zoo or unauthorized aquarium, they seem to be assuming that all zoos and aquariums are like it and that's just plain not true. Also, if they're dealing with endangered species, any zoo where animals are being treated badly is actually illegal and shouldn't be running to begin with. But any good, authorized zoo has fairly natural diets for animals and naturalistic habitats where the animal can hide and exhibit other natural behaviors. Also, a lot of zoos have outside enclosures for animals like big cats and tortoises where they can get sunlight and natural food. Also, the animals probably don't want to be freed. They're pretty happy where they are, if they have good habitats and easy access to food. I'm going to cite my pet cat, Mamba. Mamba sometimes tries to go outside, but we always catch her and bring her back in. But I expect that if Mamba were to go outside and we couldn't catch her, within a couple of hours she'd be clawing and yowling at the door. Why? Because as an indoor cat, food appears. And she likes food. Also, an animal that has never been in the wild probably can't survive in the wild! And in many cases, a well-cared-for animal in a zoo will live longer than it will in the wild. Now, let's say it were you. So, you probably have easy access to food and water and a roof over your head. You have a pretty good life. (If you're not in this situation, I admire you and hope things look up for you soon.) Now, let's say a bunch of people you don't know go to your house, take you out, and destroy it. Then, they put you in the wilderness, miles away from any human habitation. How long do you think you could survive? Probably not that long! All right? Also, PETA has stated that they want a generation that doesn't do anything with animals other than leaving them in the wild. They want a generation that loves all animals. But for many children in urban areas, an encounter with a pet or an animal at a zoo or aquarium is their first experience with animals, that spark that gets them to loving more animals. And how are we supposed to get a generation that loves all animals when this generation never sees them?